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20120925
20121003
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ben bernanke to the economic club of indiana today. his speech did little to push wall street forward. in fact, the market came off of the highs as the chairman started speaking. the chairman saying he doesn't see a recession, but that growth is still too slow to boost the jobs picture. listen to this. >> right now, we see an economy which is expanding. we see employment which is one of the key indicators of recession, still growing. so we expect the economy to continue to grow. that's our best forecast as of now. so we're not expecting a recession. that being said, with an economy growing only sort of 1.5% to 2%, that is not fast enough to lower the unemployment rate. that is my concern. >> all right. we have reaction now to that. and today's big gains in our "closing bell" exchange, plus we're talking strategies for the coming quarter. a quarter that has historically been good for the bulls. with us today, todd of black bay grou group. paul shots of heritage market. and our own rick santelli. paul, i'm going to start with you because you make a bold statement. you feel right now ben
of the gains after federal reserve chairman ben bernanke defended the central bank's latest bond buying stimulus program. is that a red flag that this fed-fueled rally is in trouble? top strategists are weigh in tonight. take a look at how we're finishing the day on wall street. as you can see, things settled out, dow jones industrial average held on to a double-digit move, although well off of that 161-point rally. the nasdaq went negative, although it, too, came back off of the worst levels finishing flat on the session. that had everything to do with apple. apple stock today down bringing the rest of the market down with it. it is in so many portfolios. s&p 500 up. it's the last day of the quarter of the year. we closed off the highs of the day. not a bad way to kick off the fourth quarter. is today's performance a good indicator of what's ahead? should investors be bracing for a rocky road going into year end? i bring in right now wells fargo adviser, chase investment council, peter, cnbc.com's jeff cox, our own rick santelli. good to see you all. thank you so much for joining us. w
of white noise, maybe people listen to ben bernanke yesterday. it just didn't add up. i can't tell you what was going on. >> what didn't add up, rick? how about the milton friedman stock? i know you've been all over that all day, so i brought a quote for you, rick. >> uh-oh. >> i brought a quote. milton friedman in his own words. now, rick, i know what you said, that anna schwartz -- >> i figured you were on for a reason today. >> what's that? >> i figured you were here for a reason. >> go ahead. >> i'm here to talk about jobs, but if we could have an aside, discussion, me and rick on the side. here's what milton friedman said in his own words in 2000. now the bank of japan's argument is, oh, well, we've got the interest rate down to zero, what more can we do? it's very simple. they can buy securities and they can keep buying them and providing high-powered money in until the high powered money gets the economy in an expansion. >> must have been a fun dinner conversation around the friedman table. >> exactly. >> i'm only talking about credit crisis issues. only give me quotes after the summ
it comes up federal reserve of washington, d.c. my theory is ben bernanke knows where jimmy hoffa is. come clean, mr. bernanke. let's setting this once and for all. >> the feds on line 2 for bob. >> it impressed me people didn't know who jimmy hoffa was. there's going to be a time i'm going to have to explain to people who o.j. simpson was. >> time goes by. >> unbelievable. very depressing. >> we can find o.j. we haven't been able to find the real killers yet though apparently. >> i'll leave it at that. >>> in one of the best tweet smackdowns ever, oreo recently asked followers if they had ever brought cookies into a movie theater. yes, i have. which prompted this response from amc theaters. "not cool, cookie. a reference to its no food policy. oreo quickly fired back. fair enough but don't hate the player, hate the game. and back and forth it went with amc's answer game on, oreo. game on. jane and bob, what do you think? this kind of social engagement help or hurt the brands themselves. jane? >> i think it helps very much. particularly amc theaters which has twice as many followers on twi
and that usually is a combination that the head of the federal reserve and ben bernanke and the new york fed and the treasury secretary so this is my statistically insignificant survey of wall street executives and who is in running for this job. jack lew is inside the white house and white house chief of staff pretty high marks. they think he is the most likely guy to be treasury secretary according to the people i talk to. major wall street ceos and the executive suite players i deal with. to comes after where it gets interesting the names that are bounced around erskine bowles from north carolina considered a moderate to conservative democrat bonn the president's deficit reduction committee with alan simpson and pretty good and we should point out he is there too but the president ignored a lot of his -- [talking over each other] >> he is seen as a guy who can bring democrats and republicans like him. the other guy out there whose name is bounced around and bounced around for four years is the ceo of black rock. i consider him a friend. the upside to larry is clearly there is no smarter g
was an advocate for open-ended qe long before fed chairman ben bernanke announced qe infinity. >> now chicago fed president charles evans is ready to take on critics of the plan. >>> we're kicking off the fourth quarter with the biggest bull of all the squawkmarket masters. the odds of hitting dow's 17,000 by the end of next year are looking better and better says jeremy siegel. the third hour of "squawk box" starts right now. ♪ >>> good morning again. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen and andrew ross sorkin and our guest host has been craig barrett, the former chairman and ceo of intel, obviously we have a lot more to discuss with him but we also have many other big guests who are joining us through the hour, don't forget that this is the beginning of the fourth quarter, you can start it off with our portfolio strategy session, speaking with jeremy siegel about the market events likely to drive the fourth quarter including the november election. coming up at 8:30 a.m. eastern, cnbc's exclusive interview with chicago fed president charlie evans, lo
from ben bernanke. >> two big downgrades on two big companies. microsoft says momentum will slow. >> and facebook's stock is up 30% from the july lows. >>> and julia boorstin with a sitdown with facebook's cheryl sandberg. >>> futures ant rise and the fourth quarter gets under way. major indices coming off a third quarter that was their best quarterly performance in two years. but there's a lot for wall street to digest this week waiting for today's monetary policy speech from bernanke. and the big jobs number is coming up on friday. it's been said that q3 was characterized by expectations from central banks, that we got what we wanted and that's not necessarily going to be the picture for this quarter. >> you're fighting worldwide feds. if you don't like the market, i understand expectations lowered along with estimates lowered. all you have to do is beat estimates even if they're lowered and you have the various feds behind you. still got a good market. >> evans this morning on "squawk" is few moments ago saying he'd like to see twist go all the way through 2013. there are thin
is benefitting our economy more broadly. >> that was chairman of the federal reserve ben bernanke yesterday discussing the fed's impact on the recovery of the housing market. and joining us now, co-host of cnbc's squawk on the street david faber, and doug lebda. good to have you both onboard this morning. it seems to me housing always seems like a separate issue that maybe didn't get talked about as much. is that retrospectively incorrect? because it does seem so fundamental, david. >> it's fundamental in the economy in many ways. certainly helped us during the boom period in housing that we saw adding to gdp, construction, and so many other things. people refinancing their homes. it hasn't been discussed that much, you're right, particularly given that the president seems to have backed off a bit, perhaps, on a number of plans that would've relieved people from mortgages that they otherwise are not in a great position to pay but there was a lot of political opposition to that. but housing is starting to come back. we are starting to see real signs of not just stabilization but even perhaps
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)